African American Studies at Beinecke Library

Event Cancelled: Lecture by Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Events, Research Resources by beineckepoetry on October 18, 2012

CANCELLED: EVENT TO BE RESCHEDULED

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, director of The New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, will be speaking at Beinecke Library, at 1pm Monday, October 29th, 2012. This event is co-sponsored by the Department of African American Studies’ Endeavors Colloquium Series.

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad took over as director at the Schomburg Center in July of 2011. Dr. Muhammad graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in economics and received his doctorate in American history from Rutgers University. He also served as a fellow at the Vera Institute of Justice, a nonprofit criminal justice reform agency in New York City. Dr. Muhammad was formerly a history professor at Indiana University. His book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, Harvard University Press, 2010, won the John Hope Franklin Publication Prize for 2011. Dr. Muhammad has participated in a PBS documentary, “Slavery by Another Name,” based on Douglas Blackmon’s book of the same name, and has appeared with Tavis Smiley and Bill Moyers.

The talk will be held in Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St., Rm 38/39 at 1:00pm on Monday, 29 October, 2012. This event is free and open to the public.

Poetry Reading: C. S. Giscombe

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Events by beineckepoetry on October 12, 2012

C. S. Giscombe, Poetry Reading
Thursday, October 18th, 4:00pm
Beinecke Library, 121 Wall Street
Yale Collection of American Literature Reading Series
Contact: nancy.kuhl@yale.edu

C.S. Giscombe is the author of books including Prairie Style, Two Sections from Practical Geography, Giscome Road, Here, At Large, Postcards, and Into and Out of Dislocation. Prairie Style was awarded an American Book Award by the Before Columbus Foundation; Giscome Road won the Carl Sandburg Prize, given by the Chicago Public Library. In 2010, Giscombe received the Stephen Henderson Award in Poetry from the African American Literature and Culture Society; he has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Fund for Poetry. He is a member of the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley.

James Weldon Johnson Memorial Lecture

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Beinecke Collections, Events by beineckepoetry on September 12, 2012

Arnold Rampersad

“Reflections on Nationalism and Literature”

Tuesday, September 18, 4pm
Beinecke Library, 121 Wall Street
James Weldon Johnson Memorial Lecture 
Contact: nancy.kuhl@yale.edu

Arnold Rampersad is the author of  many books, including: Ralph Ellison; The Life of Langston Hughes; The Art and Imagination of W.E.B. DuBois; Jackie Robinson: A Biography; Days of Grace: A Memoir (1993), co-authored with Arthur Ashe. He is the editor of volumes including Collected Poems of Langston Hughes; the Library of America edition of works by Richard Wright; and as, co-editor with Deborah McDowell, Slavery and the Literary Imagination. With Shelley Fisher Fishkin he was co-editor, of the Race and American Culture book series published by Oxford University Press. He has been awarded the National Humanities Medal and a fellowship from the  MacArthur Foundation. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. He has taught at Stanford, Columbia, Rutgers, and Princeton.

The James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of Arts and Letters at the Beinecke Library was founded by Carl Van Vechten in 1941 in honor of James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938), poet, novelist, lyricist, diplomat, educator, and noted civil rights leader. The Collection celebrates the accomplishments of African American writers and artists from the Harlem Renaissance to the present.

Co-sponsored by the Department of African American Studies.

Exhibition Opening: Remembering Shakespeare

Posted in announcements, Beinecke Collections, Events, Exhibitions by beineckepoetry on February 7, 2012

Please join us next Wednesday, February 15, at 4:30 pm on the Beinecke Library mezzanine for the opening of the Beinecke’s spring exhibition, “Remembering Shakespeare.”

Remembering Shakespeare
Wednesday, February 1 – Monday, June 4, 2012

Remembering Shakespeare tells the story of how a playwright and poet in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century England came to be remembered as the world’s most venerated author. Curated by David Scott Kastan, George M. Bodman Professor of English at Yale, and Kathryn James, Beinecke Library Curator, the exhibition brings together works from the holdings of Yale University’s Elizabethan Club, Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale Center for British Art, and Beinecke Library, in an unprecedented display of one of North America’s finest collections on Shakespeare. Drawing on these extraordinary resources, Remembering Shakespeare offers a unique visual history of how the “Booke” of Shakespeare was made and read, written and remembered, from his lifetime through the present.

Image: Paul Robeson in the role of Othello, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944. Photographs by Carl Van Vechten are used with permission of the Van Vechten Trust; permission of the Trust is required to publish Van Vechten photographs in any format. To learn more, contact the Curator, Yale Collection of American Literature.

This exhibition is part of Shakespeare at Yale, a multi-venued celebration for the spring of 2012 that will display the extraordinary resources that exist at the University for the study and enjoyment of Shakespeare. For more information, visit: Shakespeare at Yale.

Colson Whitehead Reading

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Events by beineckepoetry on February 4, 2012

Colson Whitehead, Reading
Monday, February 6, time 4:30pm
Beinecke Library, 121 Wall Street
Yale Collection of American Literature Reading Series
Contact: louise.bernard@yale.edu

Colson Whitehead is the author of the novels The Intuitionist (1999), a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award; John Henry Days (2001), which won the Young Lions Fiction Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Prize, and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; Apex Hides the Hurt (2006), which won the PEN/Oakland award; Sag Harbor (2009), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner; and, most recently, Zone One (2011), a zombie novel set in Manhattan. He has also written a book of essays about his hometown, The Colossus of New York (2003), and his reviews, essays, and fiction have appeared in a number of publications, including The New York Times, The New Yorker, Harper’s, and Grantland.com. A recipient of a Whiting Writers Award and a MacArthur Fellowship, Whitehead lives in Brooklyn, and teaches in the Creative Writing Program at Princeton.

VISITING FELLOW TALK

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Beinecke Collections, Events by beineckepoetry on January 30, 2012

Crossing the Atlantic: More thoughts on the Slave Trade

Monday, January 30, 2012 at 2:30 p.m.
Beinecke Library, Room 39

The Atlantic slave trade continues to intrigue – and confuse. The best part of twelve million Africans were loaded onto the slave ships: eleven million survived to landfall. But many of the older ideas of the precise nature of that trade are now under scrutiny. The violent experience on board the slave ships attracts less attention than it ought. And what persuaded generations of slave traders to inflict such sea borne horrors on so many Africans? More perplexing still, why did the western world turn against the slave trade ( which yielded so much material bounty and prosperity) – and in so short a span of time? In 1700 few questioned the trade: by 1800 it was roundly condemned.

James Walvin is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of York U.K. where he taught for many years. He has published widely on the history of slavery, and on modern British social history. Among his recent books are The Slave Trade, (Thames and Hudson, London, 2011) and The Zong. A Massacre, the Law, and the End of Slavery, (Yale University Press, 2011.) At the Beinecke he plans to continue his work on the slave trade by exploring the manuscript and printed collections relating to the slave trade in the South Atlantic in the nineteenth century.

“This is My Life”

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Beinecke Collections, Events, Research Resources by beineckepoetry on September 28, 2011

“This Is My Life”: The Sonnet and the Emergence of Black Subjectivity
Thursday, September 29, 2011 at 2:00 pm
Beinecke Library, Room 38

Part of a larger research project on the African American sonnet, this talk will explore the role of the sonnet form in the emergence of an individualized subjectivity in turn-of-the-century black writing. African American poetry in the nineteenth century was overwhelmingly public. Where it did not take a stand in political debates, it at least presented the kind of exteriorized, carefully crafted persona deemed suitable in the struggle for cultural recognition. It was in the sonnet, that poets were first able to move beyond these constraints toward a fuller self-expression. Dunbar, Braithwaite, and a number of their contemporaries took advantage of the emotional depth associated with the sonnet form to articulate a literary subjectivity that was often partial and paradoxical but constituted an important step toward cultural and psychological emancipation.

Timo Müller is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Augsburg, Germany, where he obtained his Ph.D. in 2009. His main research areas are modernism, ecocriticism, and African American and Caribbean literature. He has published The Self as Object in Modernist Fiction: James, Joyce, Hemingway (2010) as well as articles in journals including Anglia, The Journal of Modern Literature, and Twentieth-Century Literature. An article on James Weldon Johnson and the genteel tradition is forthcoming. His research at Beinecke is for his current book project, The African American Sonnet.

Image: Aaron Douglas illustration appearing in Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life, 1926.

Party!

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Beinecke Collections, Events, Exhibitions by beineckepoetry on September 20, 2011

Multitudes: A Celebration of the Yale Collection of American Literature, 1911 – 2011

EXHIBITION CLOSING PARTY
Friday, September 23, 2011 at 5:00

 

More about Multitudes: http://beineckepoetry.library.yale.edu/2011/09/14/multitudes/

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Yale University, 121 Wall Street, New Haven
Free and open to the public

Yale College Poets Reading

Posted in announcements, Events by beineckepoetry on April 6, 2011


Kevin Young at Yale

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Events, Exhibitions by beineckepoetry on April 1, 2011

Tuesday, April 5 at 4:00, Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG), The Schlesinger Visiting Writer Series presents:
Kevin Young, the Atticus Haygood Professor of English and Creative Writing, and Curator of Literary Collections and the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library, Emory University.

A reading in conjunction with the Yale University Art Gallery’s current exhibition, Embodied: Black Identities in American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition, a collaboration among a team of students from Yale and the University of Maryland, College Park, features works that address, question, and complicate the paradigms that have mapped meanings onto African American bodies throughout history. The 54 works selected for the exhibition, representing the Gallery’s commitment during the past decade to growing this area of the collection, include paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, prints, drawings, and photographs.

Sponsored by the Yale University Art Gallery, the Schlesinger Visiting Writer Series, and the Departments of African American Studies and English, and the Beinecke Library.