African American Studies at Beinecke Library

Poetry Readings

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Events by beineckepoetry on March 28, 2011

Natasha Trethewey, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Thomas Sayers Ellis, Poetry Reading
Thursday, March 31, 2011 5:30 PM
Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel Street
An Evening of Poetry at the Gallery
Contact: artgalleryinfo@yale.edu

A reading in conjunction with the Yale University Art Gallery’s current exhibition, Embodied: Black Identities in American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition, a collaboration among a team of students from Yale and the University of Maryland, College Park, features works that address, question, and complicate the paradigms that have mapped meanings onto African American bodies throughout history. The 54 works selected for the exhibition, representing the Gallery’s commitment during the past decade to growing this area of the collection, include paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, prints, drawings, and photographs.

The Beinecke Library is a co-sponsor of this event.

Hilton Als at Beinecke

Posted in Uncategorized by beineckepoetry on March 16, 2011

THE JAMES WELDON JOHNSON MEMORIAL LECTURE | 2011  

A Reading & Conversation with New Yorker critic Hilton Als

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 at 4:00 pm

Hilton Als, a staff writer and theatre critic at The New Yorker, is a recipient of a Guggenheim Award for Creative Writing, and the George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism. He has written for The Village Voice and The Nation, and served as Editor-at-Large at Vibe magazine. He edited the catalogue for the Whitney Museum of American Art exhibition “Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art” (November 1994-March 1995) and recently co-curated the exhibition “Self-Consciousness” with the artist Peter Doig at the Veneklasen Werner Gallery in Berlin (2010). His book, The Women, a meditation on gender, race, and personal identity, was published by FSG in 1996. Als has taught at Yale, Wesleyan, and Smith College. He lives in New York City.

The James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of Arts and Letters at the Beinecke Library was founded by Carl Van Vechten in 1941 in honor of James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938), poet, novelist, lyricist, diplomat, educator, and noted civil rights leader. The Collection celebrates the accomplishments of African American writers and artists from the Harlem Renaissance to the present.

Co-sponsored by the Department of African American Studies and Calhoun College

Psyche & Muse Online

Posted in African American Studies at Yale, announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions by beineckepoetry on March 9, 2011

Detailed information about collection materials featured in the current exhibition, Psyche & Muse: Creative Entanglements with the Science of the Soul are now available online: Psyche & Muse online .

Books, manuscripts, correspondence, photographs, and objects described in the Exhibition Checklists & Object Descriptions may located by consulting the Library’s primary finding tools: Orbis, the catalog for books; Yale’s Finding Aid Database for manuscript materials; and the Beinecke Digital Library.

Psyche and Muse: Creative Entanglements with the Science of the Soul explores the influence of cultural, clinical, and scientific dialogues about human psychology on twentieth-century writers, artists, and thinkers. Tracing important themes in the lives and work of key figures and artistic communities represented in the Beinecke Library’s Modern European and American Literature collections, Psyche and Muse documents a range of imaginative encounters involving the arts and the study of the mind. On view from January 28 through June 13, 2011 at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University, 121 Wall Street, New Haven. Free and open to the public.

Image: Aldo Piromalli, Psychiatry, or Death of the Soul, Amsterdam: Vrije Vogel Pers, 1977. A tiny fold-out flier, this colorful comic strip expresses Piromalli’s personal frustration, exiled in Amsterdam on pain of incarceration in a mental asylum should he return to Italy. But it also echoes the broader revolt against psychiatric norms and inhuman treatment that ignited social protest across Europe in the sixties and seventies. Here Piromalli objects to the label “schizophrenic” and singles out “brain-slicing operations.” Other frames in the strip portray electroshocks and drug therapy in equally graphic ways.